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The National Palace Or Palacio Nacional
Diego Rivera Murals.

Mexico City D.F. México
Travels & Tours
Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.

George & Eve DeLange

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We have placed a series of large photos of some of Diego Rivera's work that can be found in the National Palace of Mexico City upon this page.

This building is now housing the Secretary Of Public Education of Mexico City, or Secretaría de Educación Pública, Ciudad de México.

We have tried to show accurate descriptions of each photo just below the image.

A brief description of Diego Rivera will follow the images.

These large pictures were taken at the National Palace of Mexico City on November 22, 2011.

Mural by Diego Rivera: 'Exploitation of Mexico by Spanish Conquistadors.' Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México.  Travel & Tour Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.
Mural ( 1929 - 1945 ) by Diego Rivera: "Exploitation of Mexico by Spanish Conquistadors."
Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. November 22, 2011.
Mural by Diego Rivera: 'Totonac Civilization, El Tajin.' Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México.  Travel & Tour Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.
"Totonac Civilization, El Tajin." 1950 by Diego Rivera.
Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. November 22, 2011.
Mural by Diego Rivera: 'Totonac Civilization, El Tajin.' Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México.  Travel & Tour Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.
"The Great City of Tenochtitlan." 1945 by Diego Rivera.
Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. November 22, 2011.
Mural by Diego Rivera: 'The Zapotec and Mixtec Civilization.' Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México.  Travel & Tour Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.
"The Zapotec and Mixtec Civilization." 1945 by Diego Rivera.
Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. November 22, 2011.
Here we see the Zapotec and Mixtec cultures in the state of Oaxaca
who developed the art of designing with feathers as well the art of jewelry making with fine metals.
In the background, the people are panning for precious metals. Probably, gold?
In the right foreground the use of metal technology is shown.
The official museum guide says that they used the lost wax method.
In the Grisailles underneath the polychrone panel, we can see from left to right:: mining; carving; & the jade trade.
Mural by Diego Rivera: 'The Zapotec and Mixtec Civilization.' Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México.  Travel & Tour Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.
"The Tarascan & Purepechan Culture Of Michoacan." 1945 by Diego Rivera.
Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. November 22, 2011.
This scene many important cultural developments.
In the background fishermen are useing butterfly nets, native people are harvesting cotton,
as well as, cochineal from the nopal cactus to produce
the red dye for the elite or to be shipped to the royals of the "old world".
In the middle ground, a large building with a complex roof is being built
and immediately behind it, miners are
extracting coal from the side of a cliff. In the foreground dyers are tinting cloth
and hanging it to dry. Artists are painting a topographic map.
Another elaborately dressed and tattooed standing man is holding up a beautiful codex.
The Volcanoes and Lake Patzcuaro are in the far distance.
Also, in the grisailles, underneath the polychrone panel, we can see from left to right:
artists dying cloth, with either one or both species of two purple snails,
either the muricid, Plicopurpura pansa, or sometimes the thaid, Thais kiosquiformis.
Also in the grisailles, sculptors, and ceramicists; can be seen tattooing.

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Part Of Diego Rivera's Mural Depicting Mexico's History.' Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. Travel & Tour Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.
Mural ( 1929 - 1945 ) by Diego Rivera: "Part Of Diego Rivera's Mural Depicting Mexico's History."
Also Called: "México en la historia, perspectiva: El campesino oprimido, 1935.
Near Left Staircase. Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. November 22, 2011.
Part Of Diego Rivera's Mural Depicting Mexico's History.' Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. Travel & Tour Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.
Mural ( 1929 - 1945 ) by Diego Rivera: "Part Of Diego Rivera's Mural Depicting Mexico's History."
Also Called: "México en la historia, perspectiva: El campesino oprimido, 1935.
Near Left Staircase. Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. November 22, 2011.
Part Of Diego Rivera's Mural Depicting Mexico's History.' Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. Travel & Tour Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.
Mural ( 1929 - 1945 ) by Diego Rivera: "Part Of Diego Rivera's Mural Depicting Mexico's History."
Also Called: "México en la historia, perspectiva: El campesino oprimido, 1935.
Near Left Staircase. Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. November 22, 2011.
Part Of Diego Rivera's Mural Depicting Mexico's History.' Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. Travel & Tour Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.
Mural ( 1929 - 1945 ) by Diego Rivera: "Part Of Diego Rivera's Mural Depicting Mexico's History."
Also Called: "México en la historia, perspectiva: El campesino oprimido, 1935.
Near Left Staircase. Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. November 22, 2011.
Part Of Diego Rivera's Mural Depicting Mexico's History.' Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. Travel & Tour Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.
Mural ( 1929 - 1945 ) by Diego Rivera: "Part Of Diego Rivera's Mural Depicting Mexico's History."
Also Called: "México en la historia, perspectiva: El campesino oprimido, 1935.
Near Left Staircase. Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. November 22, 2011.
The Legend of Quetzalcoatl.' Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. Travel & Tour Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.
Mural ( 1929 - 1930 ) by Diego Rivera: "The Legend of Quetzalcoatl."
Near Right Staircase. Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México. November 22, 2011.
Mexico's legendary and precolonial past is represented here with the central focus on Quetzalcoatl,
a god of the Toltecs, Mayans, and Aztecs.
Quetzalcoatl (also Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl) (also Kukulcan)
is shown wearing a headdress of quetzal feathers and a conch shell on his chest,
which is a symbol of the wind god; he also is holding a curved baton,
the scepter of the seven stars or constellations. Behind him are the pyramids of the Sun and Moon
in the city of Teotihuacán, which is the great political and religious center of pre-Hispanic Mexico.
However the upside down sun in the mural, indicates the decline of these pre-Hispanic cultures.
Quetzalcoatl is shown in human form as blond and white. It has often been said the Aztec Emperor Moctezuma II
initially believed the landing of Hernán Cortés in 1519 to be Quetzalcoatl's return
although that statement has not been proven. To Quetzalcoatl's right are four aligned figures
with outstretched arms which could represent the four elements of the prehispanic cosmos: earth, water,
fire, and wind. Below various artisan activities are represented: directly below him is a gold worker
and next to him a ceramicist making pots. Across from them a sculptor engraves
a large stele while a scribe paints a codex. At the far right of this detail a painter decorates a pot.
On the left, the plumed serpent rises from the erupting volcano's mouth--a divine form of Quetzalcoatl;
on the right, Quetzalcoatl assumes the form of the morning star Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli, which appears near
the sun at sunrise. Native legend predicts his return to earth.
-The left hand side depicts subject peoples bringing tribute - -the huge bales,
a grand victorious warrior colorfully dressed, and a prisoner of war wearing a garment with bone designs,
waiting to be sacrificed.
At the far right:, dancers and musicians engage in a ceremony before the corn harvest.
Musicians play percussion instruments as well as horns of conch shell.
Other plants are also represented which scholars suggest, refer to drinks or hallucinogens, perhaps used in rituals.
Below the dancers, we see farmers planting corn. On the left side bottom,
we see a battle between various Aztec warriors and others.
The weapons are apparently accurately depicted. We can see the shields' interiors of braided leather.
Wooden swords with obsidian blades on the edges and two warriors are seen holding obsidian axes.

Diego María de la Concepción Juan Nepomuceno Estanislao de la Rivera y Barrientos Acosta y Rodríguez was born on the 8th of December of 1886, and died on the 24th of November of 1957.

He was the Mexican painter born in Guanajato, an active communist, and husband of Frida Kahlo. He married her twice. First in 1929 until 1939,when he divorced Frida and then, he married her again in 1940, he remained with her until her death on July 13, 1954.

Rivera painted murals among lots of cities; in Mexico City, Chapingo, Cuernavaca, San Francisco, Detroit, and New York City.

Diego Rivera the man is very different than Diego Rivera the artist. Rivera the political man is also of almost as much interest as Rivera the artist. The painter was a lifelong militant atheist and revolutionary Marxist.

One day when Diego was 6 years old, he was taken to the Church of San Diego to pray to the Virgin Mary. When he walked in, anger took hold of him for he did not believe in God and found the religion to be a joke, eventually he could hold his feelings in no longer, and ran from his aunt to the altar. In a strong and confident voice, he addressed the following speech to the crowd: "......... Stupid people! You reek of dirt and stupidity!....If there really is a Holy Virgin or anyone up in the air, tell them to send lightening to strike me down ...If God doesn't stop me, then there must be no God. Get out of here! You see, there is no God! You're all stupid cows!"

Diego's harsh words caused the people in the church to run out screaming that the devil had appeared. The people made sure to run home and shut their windows and doors against this evil force. Diego Rivera, even at the young age of 6, knew how to shock a crowd.

A lifelong atheist, he experienced a "deathbed conversion" late in life. At age 70, Rivera marched into the Hotel del Prado and painted over the inscription "Dios no existe" on his controversial work, "Dream of a Sunday Afternoon in the Alameda". He then held a press conference to proclaim his faith in Catholicism.

As a human being, he was capable of great folly. He was a liar, a mythomaniac, an artificer. He could be devious and selfish. He was not always brave. His exuberant creativity was shared between his art and his public self. No artist wore so many masks of his own invention. There was the mask of Diego the Marxist Revolutionary. There was Diego the Womanizer. There was Diego the Archaeologist. And there were more: Diego the Biologist, Diego the Sophisticate, Diego the Union Leader, Diego the Bohemian, Diego the Propagandist, Diego the Art Critic. Of Diego Rivera it could be truly said that if you peeled away the mask you would find the mask underneath.

He had done something that few artists have ever done: he’d given a nation an identity. Rivera put his stamp on Mexico the way Bernini placed his on Rome. It is impossible to think of Mexico today without also seeing the images of Diego Rivera.

In his best mural paintings, he merged past, present, and future into dense, crowded visions of an essential Mexico. He drew on Mexican history, folk art, the discoveries of archaeology and other sciences. He mixed them in his own powerful imagination, refined by long years of apprenticeship in Europe, and made something that was not there before: a unifying, celebratory image of Mexico. In his art, he unified a people long fractured by history, language, racism, religious and political schism. He said in his art: you are all Mexico.

Inside the palace there are murals painted by Diego Rivera, they were painted between 1929 and 1945. His México a Través de los Siglos (Mexico Through the Centuries), on the main stairwell leading to the first floor, depicts every major event and person of Mexican history, from Cortés’ conquest of the Aztecs and Mexico to the Mexican Revolution, all with Rivera’s typical Marxist twist. The most famous being the "Epic of the Mexican People in their Struggle for Freedom and Independence", which condenses two thousand years of history onto the space of a wall.

Our favorite is "The Legend of Quetzalcoatl" which shows the famous tale of the feathered serpent bringing a blond-bearded white man to the country.

When Cortés first arrived, many Aztecs, recalling this legend, believed him to be Quetzalcoatl. Soon they realized that he was anything but this beloved god.

Another mural tells of the American Intervention when American invaders marched into Mexico City during the War of 1847. It was on this occasion that the military cadets of Chapultepec Castle (then a military school) fought bravely to the last man. The most notable of Rivera's murals is the Great City of Tenochtitlán, a study of the original settlement in the Valley of Mexico.

Diego Rivera died in Mexico City two weeks before his seventy-second birthday. Date of his death is November 24, 1957.

These pictures were taken January 12, 2005 and on January 18, 2005.

The Mexico City International Airport (Spanish: Aeropuerto Internacional de la Ciudad de México or AICM), also called Benito Juárez International Airport (IATA: MEX, ICAO: MMMX) is the major commercial airport that serves Mexico City, the capital of Mexico. It is also Mexico's and Latin America's busiest airport!


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We have some links to Priceline.com on this page, since they can arrange all of your air flights, hotels and car.

We of course, appreciate your use of the advertising on our pages, since it helps us to keep our pages active.

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'Cocoa.' National Palace Or Palacio Nacional. Diego Rivera Murals. Mexico City D.F. México Travel & Tour Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.Huaxtec Civilization Maize. National Palace Or Palacio Nacional Diego Rivera Murals. Mexico City D.F. Mexico Travel & Tour Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.
Cocoa. 1950.
National Palace Or Palacio Nacional Diego Rivera Murals.
Here we see a tall, narrow vertical panel depicting
the harvesting of cacao pods.
We can see the way the plant was grown and harvested.
They are using a long reed pole.
At the bottom we see a grisaille, illustrating
the common use of cacao beans as currency.
A paste of roasted ground cacao beans was
called "choco-atl," a Nahuatl word meaning "bitter water,"
which was called, "the drink of the gods."
The grisaille below shows the use of cacao beans as currency.
Huaxtec Civilization Maize. 1950. National Palace
Or Palacio Nacional Diego Rivera Murals.
The scene is presided
over by Teocintle, the tutelary spirit of corn.
The background depicts the system of "chinampas" farming,
which is by farming fields in marshes, or lakes;
or by farming man-made islets for farming
with furrows or canals between them. These canals
carry the eye to the background
with the dramatic snow-covered peak.
The figure in the foreground right uses a
"coa" which has a pointed end for sowing.
On the left different corn dishes are made including atole,
a drink made of corn meal gruel.
The corn deity is richly dressed
and holds double ears of corn in each hand.
The multiple tasks of preparing corn are illustrated,
including grinding corn on the age-old metate.
The tinted grisaille at the bottom has a pictogram
for water upon it. The word on the top border
of the grisaille says "totopánitl,"
--a term referring to the corn stalk worn in ritual dances.
The figures, Oxomoco and Cipactonal are the
semi-divine couple, who cast maize as a form of divination.
Also attributed to them are the invention of the calendar,
curing of illness, and the interpretation of dreams.
'Maguey, Agave, and Sisal Plants.' National Palace Or Palacio Nacional. Diego Rivera Murals. Mexico City D.F. México Travel & Tour Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.'The Legend of Quetzalcoatl.' National Palace Or Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. Mexico Travel & Tour Pictures, Photos, Images, & Reviews.
Maguey, Agave, and Sisal Plants. 1951.
National Palace Or Palacio Nacional Diego Rivera Murals.
This narrow double panel depicts in the upper left
men scraping the maguey/agave for its sap
which is fermented to become pulque.
On the right amatl bark is stripped
from the tree (a Mexican fig tree).
After being soaked in the river,
it is beaten so that it becomes flat
and can become a sheet of paper.
The tinted grisaille is showing a codex
made from amate bark paper
The codex illustrates the arrival
of the Spanish and the ensuing conflict.
The scribe on the far left is applying
paint to this historical account.
Mural Detail by Diego Rivera:. ( 1929 - 1930 ).
"The Legend of Quetzalcoatl."

Near Right Staircase. Palacio Nacional. Mexico City D.F. México.
November 22, 2011.

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