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Emory Oak, Quercus emoryi.

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Emory Oak, Quercus emoryi. Also called: Live Oak, Black Oak. Arizona Wild Flowers. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions, Information, Reviews. Shrine Road, Yarnell, Arizona
Emory Oak Tree, Quercus emoryi.
Shrine Road, Yarnell, Arizona September 30, 2006.
Leaves & Acorn Emory Oak, Quercus emoryi.Acorn Quercus emoryi.
Leaves & Acorn.
Emory Oak, Quercus emoryi.
Acorn.
Emory Oak, Quercus emoryi.
Flowers Catkins Emory Oak, Quercus emoryi.Flower Catkin Emory Oak, Quercus emoryi.
Flowers Catkins.
Emory Oak, Quercus emoryi.
Flower Catkin.
Emory Oak, Quercus emoryi.
Male Flowers Catkins Emory Oak, Quercus emoryi.Female Flower Catkin Emory Oak, Quercus emoryi.
Male Flowers Close Up.
Emory Oak, Quercus emoryi.
Female Flowers Close Up.
Emory Oak, Quercus emoryi.

Emory Oak.
Quercus emoryi, Beech Family: ( Fagaceae ), Emory Oak. Also called: Live Oak, Black Oak, Bellota, Roble Negro, Holly Oak, Apache Oak, Desert Live Oak, Western Black Oak

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Emory oak is a native, monoecious shrub or medium-size tree that can reach 66 feet tall and 2 1/2 feet in diameter. It has a spreading, rounded crown with bark that is 1to 2 inches thick. Its drought-deciduous leaves are thick and 1 1/2 to 3 inches long. Pistillate catkins are one to two flowered. Acorns are solitary or paired, about 1/2 long.

Although most oaks in the black oak family have acorns that take two years to mature, emory oaks produce acorns annually. They are sweet and can be eaten out of hand, and are popular with wildlife as well.

Honeybees are attracted to Oak Trees, but Oaks are important trees for beekeepers to know about.

They bloom in May or June and the nectar is poisonous for bees; when fed to larvae, the larvae can die. The nectar is not poisonous for humans


Quick Notes:

Height: Height to about 70 feet. Up to about 75 feet wide. Spreading crown with stout branches.

Trunk: Up to about 30 inches thick. A single trunk sometimes with a few branches. Each branch can be 8" - 16" in diameter.

Bark: Dark gray, becoming thick, splitting into irregular furrows and scaly ridges.

Stems: Slender, initially green turning light brown - gray.

Flowers: Monoecious; males in long drooping catkins, yellow-green; females very small spikes in leaf axils, appearing with the leaves.

Flowering Time: March through Mid- July.

Fruit: Oblong acorn, 1/2 to 1 inch long, bowl shaped cap with finely hairy scales. Acorns mature during the fall (September to November) of the same year.

Leaves: Alternate, evergreen, simple, oblong, 1 1/2 to 3 1/2 inches long, entire or toothed margin, leathery and stiff, parallel veins, heart shaped base, yellow-green to blue-green.

Found: Native to the USA (AZ, NM, TX). Also native to northern Mexico in northern Sonora, northern Chihuahua & south into Durango.

Hardiness: Usually found below Zone 8a.

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)
USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)
USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)
USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)
USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)
USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)
USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)
USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)
USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)
USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)
USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)
USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)
USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)
USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)
USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)
USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)
USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Soil pH requirements: Said to require acid soil, but not true. Our own oak trees are doing great in alkaline soil ( 8.3 pH ).

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)
7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)
7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Sun Exposure:
Full Sun

Elevation: 3,500 - 6,700 Feet.

Habitat: Alluvial fans, foothills, bajadas, barrancas, high plains, and mesas. It occurs on flat benches and ridges or steep side slopes with westerly to northerly exposures. Landscape Plant In Some Areas.

Miscellaneous: Photos Taken at Shrine Road, Yarnell, Arizona September 30, 2006. Flowers Taken April 19, 2007.

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