Arizona Citrus Fruit Gardening
For The Arizona Desert Environment.
Pictures, Photos, Images
Descriptions, Information, & Reviews.
Lemon Trees. Citrus limon, or C. limon.

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A (Citrus  limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon). Lemon Tree In Our Glendale, Arizona Home. Arizona Citrus Fruit Gardening For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions,  Information, & Reviews.
A (Citrus limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon). Lemon Tree In Our Glendale, Arizona Home. Planted In 1996.
Photo Taken At The Beginning Of The Blooming Season. March 13, 2012.
This One Lemon Tree Produces Enough Lemons For 16 Families Every Year!

Lemon Fruit.  (Citrus  limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).  Arizona Citrus Fruit Gardening For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions,  Information, & Reviews.Lemon Fruit.  (Citrus  limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).  Arizona Citrus Fruit Gardening For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions,  Information, & Reviews.
Lemon Fruit. (Citrus limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).
Photo At End Of Fruiting Stage. Now Blooming.
Lemon Fruit. (Citrus limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).
Photo At End Of Fruiting Stage. Now Blooming.
Lemon Fruit.  (Citrus  limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).  Arizona Citrus Fruit Gardening For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions,  Information, & Reviews.Lemon Fruit.  (Citrus  limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).  Arizona Citrus Fruit Gardening For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions,  Information, & Reviews.
Lemon Fruit. (Citrus limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).
Photo At End Of Fruiting Stage. Now Blooming.
Lemon Fruit. (Citrus limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).
Photo At End Of Fruiting Stage. Now Blooming.
Lemon Flowers.  (Citrus  limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).  Arizona Citrus Fruit Gardening For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions,  Information, & Reviews.Lemon Flowers.  (Citrus  limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).  Arizona Citrus Fruit Gardening For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions,  Information, & Reviews.
Lemon Flowers. (Citrus limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).
Notice That Lemon Flowers Have A Slight Pink Color.
Lemon Flowers. (Citrus limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).
Notice That Lemon Flowers Have A Slight Pink Color.
Lemon Flowers.  (Citrus  limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).  Arizona Citrus Fruit Gardening For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions,  Information, & Reviews.Lemon Flowers With Honeybee.  (Citrus  limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).  Arizona Citrus Fruit Gardening For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions,  Information, & Reviews.
Lemon Flowers. (Citrus limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).
Notice That Lemon Flowers Have A Slight Pink Color.
Lemon Flowers & Honeybee. (Citrus limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).
Notice That Lemon Flowers Have A Slight Pink Color.
Lemon Flower Buds.  (Citrus  limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).  Arizona Citrus Fruit Gardening For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions,  Information, & Reviews.Lemon  Leaves.  (Citrus  limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).  Arizona Citrus Fruit Gardening For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions,  Information, & Reviews.
Lemon Flower Buds. (Citrus limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).
Notice That Unopen Flowers Have A Slight Pink Color.
The Green One Is Pollenated!
Lemon Leaves. (Citrus limon,) Often Cited As (C. limon).

Lemon Trees.
Citrus limon or C. limon, Rue or Ruta Family ( Rutaceae ), Commonly Known As: Lemon Trees.

HISTORY OF LEMON TREES:

We wish to thank Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia; for much of the information on our page. We also share our information and photos with Wikipedia.

The exact origin of the lemon has remained a mystery, though it is widely presumed that lemons first grew in Southern India, northern Burma, and China.

In South and South East Asia, it was known for its antiseptic properties and it was used as an antidote for various poisons. Lemons entered Europe (near southern Italy) no later than the 1st century CE, during the time of Ancient Rome. However, they were not widely cultivated. It was later introduced to Persia and then to Iraq and Egypt around CE 700. The lemon was first recorded in literature in a 10th century Arabic treatise on farming, and was also used as an ornamental plant in early Islamic gardens. It was distributed widely throughout the Arab world and the Mediterranean region between 1000 and 1150.

The first substantial cultivation of lemons in Europe began in Genoa in the middle of the 15th century.

The first substantial cultivation of lemons in Europe began in Genoa in the middle of the 15th century.

It was later introduced to the Americas in 1493 when Christopher Columbus brought lemon seeds to Hispaniola along his voyages. Spanish conquest throughout the New World helped spread lemon seeds. It was mainly used as ornament and medicine.

In the 18th and 19th centuries, when lemons were first used widely in cooking and flavoring, they were increasingly planted in Florida and California.

In 1747, James Lind's experiments on seamen suffering from scurvy involved adding vitamin C to their diets with lemon juice.

It has been suggested that lemons, limes and sour orange are mutations of the citron. A recent study of the genetic origin of the lemon, however, reports that it is a hybrid between the sour orange and citron.

DESCRIPTION OF LEMONS:

The fruit is used for culinary and non-culinary purposes throughout the world primarily for its juice, though the pulp and rind (zest) are also used, mainly in cooking and baking. Lemon juice is about 5% to 6% (approximately 0.3 M) citric acid, which gives lemons a sour taste, and a pH of 23. Many lemon flavored drinks and foods are available, including lemonade and sherbet lemons, as well as lemon and seasoning salt as a snack. The distinctive sour taste of lemon juice makes it a key ingredient in many dishes across the world

GROWING LEMONS IN ARIZONA:

Our weather in the Arizona desert produces some of the best tasting citrus in the world!

Our summer heat produces lots of sugar in citrus fruits making them sweeter and our cool weather in winter produces acid making Arizona citrus more tart.

Therefor, our Arizona hot summers and cool winters in the desert produce a much fuller flavored fruit than can be grown in either the consistently warm climates such as in Florida, or the consistently mild climates such as on the California coastal regions.

A second advantage is that Arizona citrus can still be grown on Sour Orange root stock, which produces some of the best tasting fruit. California and Florida have both baned Sour Orange rootstock because of its susceptibility to Tristeza, a citrus disease carried by a brown aphid. Fortunately, this aphid cannot survive the lower desert heat of Arizona.

Generally speaking, just about any citrus will grow in the low desert areas of Arizona.

A great resource about Citrus in Arizona is written by the Arizona Cooperative Extension, College of Agriculture, The University of Arizona. It is called, a Crop Profile for Citrus in Arizona.

When to Plant:

The best time of year to plant a citrus tree is in very early fall. Usually in late September. At that time the hottest part of the year is over and the tree will have the maximum amount of time to become well established before the hot weather arrives next summer.

Planting Depth:

Dig your hole at least twice the size of the rootball. At minimum, make the hole 2 feet in diameter and 2 feet deep. After you have planted the tree and added your soil to the hole, it is best if the hole is recessed about 2 inches so that a watering basin is formed.

Since our soil is often clay soil, we recommend adding some well blended sand, gypsum, and mulch to your soil, around the roots in the hole. The quality you want in your soil is to have good drainage.

One common problem in Arizona is that we have a hard layer under our soil called caliche. In digging your hole make sure that you dig through the caliche layer. Sometimes a jack hammer is needed to do this. Many nurseries will offer to plant your tree for you for an extra fee.

WATERING:
Either the basin or flood irrigation method is recommended because it helps keep the salts in our Arizona hard water from accumulating around the roots. Furthermore, deep watering encourages the plant to develop deeper roots, making the plant stronger when the Arizona weather gets hot and dry.

Assuming you are planting in the fall. For the first two weeks after planting, water every three days. After that, the normal schedule should be followed.

When watering citrus flood them very thoroughly for 30 minutes to an hour.

Citrus do better if they dry out between waterings. In the hottest part of summer water once every one to two weeks. In the winter water once every four to six weeks. During other times of the year, schedule watering between these two extremes

We actually use a drip system and run three drip emitters for 15 minutes, every two days. It works great! We started the plants with the basin method about 10 years ago.

FERTILIZING:
It is recommended to fertilize citrus three times a year for maximum growth in early March, late May, and middle September.

Newly planted trees should not be fertilized the first year because they are too easily burned.

Slow growing citrus need less fertilizer than more vigorous varieties.

Generally speaking, the recommendations on chemical citrus fertilizers bags are generally too high. We recommend that you use half the rates recommended.

Remember that most citrus trees can go for years without fertilizers and be relatively healthy as long as they are correctly watered. But, over fertilizing a tree can cripple and kill the tree rather quickly.

Also, slow release chemical fertilizers, and organic fertilizers such as fish emulsion; can also be used, and they are less likely to burn your trees.

We recommend that slow release fertilizer can be applied at the beginning of the growing season in March and once again in the middle of the growing season in early June.

Organic fertilizers such as fish emulsion can be applied monthly.

You can also apply any one of these fertilizers less often and at lower rates, if you feel you need to do so.

HINTS & TIPS:

Citrus tolerate the summer sun well in the Phoenix Area, but will always get some sun burned leaves during the hottest weather. Nothing to be concerned about!

Water regularly; do not overwater.

This plant is attractive to bees.

DISEASES & PESTS:
Of the more than 30 virus and virus-like diseases that have been described world wide, only Tristeza, Psorosis, and a mycoplasma disease - Stub-born; are presently known to occur in Arizona.

A great resource about CITRUS DISEASE in Arizona is written by the Arizona Cooperative Extension, College of Agriculture, The University of Arizona. It is called, the manual of Citrus Diseases of Citrus in Arizona.


The common insect pests of Citrus in Arizona Are: Orange Dog Caterpillar, Aphids, Cottony-cushion Scale, Citrus Thrips, Flower Thrips, & Citrus Mites.

A great resource about CITRUS PESTS in Arizona is written by the Arizona Cooperative Extension, College of Agriculture, The University of Arizona. It is called, the manual of Citrus INSECT PESTS.

Height: About 10 - 20 feet tall.


Spread: About 3 - 15 feet wide.


Flowers: White/Near White. Buds often have a pinkish color.


Blooming Time: Spring. In Phoenix about March 15th.


Leaves: Green in color, alternately arranged evergreen leaves with an entire margin.


Elevation: 0 - 1,500 feet.


Light: Sun.


Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)
USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)
USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)
USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)


Soil pH requirements:
5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
However, tolerates Arizona's alkaline soils.


Habitat: Well-drained sandy soil, Loamy Soil, Acidic Soil. Best pH 5.8 to 6.5. Will tolerate some alkaline soils.


Native: Southeast Asia.


Miscellaneous: Photos Taken March 13, 2012 In Glendale, Arizona. Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling.


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