Xeriscape Landscaping Plants For The Arizona Desert Environment.
Pictures, Photos, Information, Descriptions,
Images, & Reviews.
Trees.

Canyon Hackberry Trees, Celtis reticulata.

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Canyon Hackberry, Celtis reticulata. Also Called: Netleaf Hackberry, Western Hackberry, Sugarberry. Xeriscape Landscaping Plants For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Information, Descriptions, Images, & Reviews. Trees. Glendale, Arizona Xeriscape Demonstration Garden.
Canyon Hackberry, Celtis reticulata.
September 13, 2006.
Glendale, Arizona Xeriscape Demonstration Garden.
Bark. Canyon Hackberry, Celtis reticulata. Also Called: Netleaf Hackberry, Western Hackberry, Sugarberry. Xeriscape Landscaping Plants For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Information, Descriptions, Images, & Reviews. Trees. Glendale, Arizona Xeriscape Demonstration Garden.Bark. Canyon Hackberry, Celtis reticulata. Also Called: Netleaf Hackberry, Western Hackberry, Sugarberry. Xeriscape Landscaping Plants For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Information, Descriptions, Images, & Reviews. Trees. Glendale, Arizona Xeriscape Demonstration Garden.
Bark.
Canyon Hackberry.
Celtis reticulata.
Bark.
Canyon Hackberry.
Celtis reticulata.
Leaves. Canyon Hackberry, Celtis reticulata. Also Called: Netleaf Hackberry, Western Hackberry, Sugarberry. Xeriscape Landscaping Plants For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Information, Descriptions, Images, & Reviews. Trees. Glendale, Arizona Xeriscape Demonstration Garden.Fruit. Canyon Hackberry, Celtis reticulata. Also Called: Netleaf Hackberry, Western Hackberry, Sugarberry. Xeriscape Landscaping Plants For The Arizona Desert Environment. Pictures, Photos, Information, Descriptions, Images, & Reviews. Trees. Glendale, Arizona Xeriscape Demonstration Garden.
Leaves.
Canyon Hackberry.
Celtis reticulata.
Fruit.
Canyon Hackberry.
Celtis reticulata.

Canyon Hackberry Tree.
Celtis reticulata, Elm Family: ( Ulmaceae ), Canyon Hackberry; Also Called: Netleaf Hackberry, Western Hackberry, Sugarberry.

We wish to thank Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia for some of the information on this page. We share images and information with Wikipedia.

Canyon Hackberry is a shrub or small tree with a spreading irregular crown. When small it spreads in an irregular fashion. As a tree it can reach 30 feet tall with a 30 foot spread.

Celtis reticulata is irregularly distributed from the Chihuahuan desert on the south to the arid plains of eastern Washington on the north. It is usually found in dry, rocky hillsides, canyons and dry stream beds from about 2,500 feet to 6,500 feet. It has a drooping form with twisted branches and trunks, with very densely divided branches and veined leaves.

Canyon Hackberry's central range includes the Rio Grande region and the Chihuahuan Desert in southern Arizona-New Mexico, western Texas, and northern Sonora-Chihuahua-Coahuila.

It also is found in Arizona and Sonora in the Madrean Sky Islands of the northern Sierra Madre Occidental; and in the White Mountains and Mogollon Rim of Arizona. It occurs at the Colorado River from the Grand Canyon northeast through Utah to western Colorado

Celtis reticulata, with common names including netleaf hackberry', western hackberry, Douglas hackberry, netleaf sugar hackberry, palo blanco, & acibuche.

It is often confused with the related species Celtis pallida, the spiny hackberry or desert hackberry, in Arizona. Also confused with Celtis occidentalis, the common hackberry, and Celtis laevigata, the sugarberry or southern hackberry.

Netleaf Hackberry can be used to attract birds and wildlife into the landscape.

In the lower desert it will not survive extended droughts without irrigation.


Quick Notes:

Height: Up To 30 feet, they spread out about 30 feet.

Trunk: The trunk bark forms vertical corky ridges that are checkered between the furrows.

Bark: Grey to brownish grey.

Flowers: The color is greenish, about 1/12 of an inch in diameter.

Blooming Time: Late February - April.

Fruit: about 5 - 12 mm in diameter, brownish to purple, pulp thin. Birds Love It!. Other animals eat it also.

Seeds: Hard, cream-colored, about 0.22 inch.

Leaves: Bright green, simple, saw-toothed elm tree-like leaves about 2 1/2 inches long.

Found: The USDA claims it is native to the USA (AZ, CA, CO, ID, KS, LA, NM, NV, OK, OR, TX, UT, WA, WY). In Arizona native to all counties except Yuma, & La Paz. In Mexico native to northern Sonora, northern Chihuahua, & Coahuila.

Elevation: Native at 2,500 - 6,500 feet.

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)
USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)
USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)
USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Soil pH requirements:
5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)
7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)
7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Sun Exposure:
Full Sun

Habitat: Pinyon-juniper woodlands. Also used for Xeriscape landscaping.

Miscellaneous: Flowering Photos Taken: March 26, 2006. Glendale Arizona Xeriscape Demonstration Garden. A low water use landscaping plant in the Phoenix and Tucson areas.

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