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Palmer's Amaranth, Amaranthus palmeri.

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Palmer's Amaranth, Amaranthus palmeri. Also Called: Palmer amaranth, Palmer's pigweed, and Carelessweed. Arizona Wild Flowers. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions, Information, Reviews.
Palmer's Amaranth, Amaranthus palmeri.
Terminal Panicle. Palmer's Amaranth, Amaranthus palmeri. Also Called: Palmer amaranth, Palmer's pigweed, and Carelessweed. Arizona Wild Flowers. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions, Information, Reviews.
Palmer Amaranth, Terminal Panicle.
Palmer's Amaranth Panicle FlowersPalmer's Amaranth Panicle Flowers
Palmer's Amaranth
Panicle Flowers.
Palmer's Amaranth
Panicle Flowers.
Amaranth Alegría CandyAmaranth Alegría Candy
Amaranth Alegría Candy.
In Tlaxcala, Mexico.
Amaranth Alegría Candy
Ready For Market.
In Tlaxcala, Mexico.
Amaranth Alegría Candy Cooking PotsThe Amaranth Alegría Candy Factory
Hector Junior, Showing Us
Alegría Candy Cooking Pots.
In Tlaxcala, Mexico.
Hector Junior,
Showing Us
The Amaranth Alegría
Candy Factory.
In Tlaxcala, Mexico.
Amaranth SeedsAmaranth Alegría Candy
Amaranth Seeds.Amaranth Alegría Candy.

Palmer's Amaranth.
Amaranthus palmeri Amaranth Family ( Amaranthaceae ), Palmer Amaranth. Also Called: Palmer amaranth, Palmer's pigweed, and Carelessweed.

We wish to thank Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia for some of the information on this page. We share images and information with Wikipedia.

Amaranthus palmeri is a species of edible flowering plant in the amaranth genus. It has several common names, including Palmer's amaranth, Palmer amaranth, Palmer's pigweed, and Carelessweed.

It is native to most of the southern half of North America. Populations in the eastern United States are probably naturalized. It has also been introduced to Europe, Australia, and other areas.

An erect summer annual that usually reaches 6 1/2 feet tall. Some have been seen as tall as 15 feet. It is considered a weedy herb. The plant is fast-growing and highly competitive.

The leaves, stems and seeds of Palmer amaranth, like those of other amaranths, are edible and highly nutritious.

Palmer's amaranth was once widely cultivated and eaten by Native Americans across North America, both for its abundant seeds and as a cooked or dried green vegetable. Other related Amaranthus species have been grown as crops for their greens and seeds for thousands of years in Mexico, South America, the Caribbean, Africa, India, and China.

However, Palmer's amaranth can be toxic to livestock animals due to the presence of nitrates in the leaves, even for humans. Like spinach and many other leafy greens, amaranth leaves also contain oxalic acid, which can be harmful to individuals with kidney problems if consumed in excess.

Because of its toxicity to livestock, and the lack of knowledge, in the United States with the uses of amaranths as food, Palmer's amaranth is rarely consumed in the USA, despite its ubiquity and resistance to drought.

In the USA, Palmer's amaranth is considered a weed and a threat most specifically to the production of genetically modified cotton and soybean crops in the southern United States because in many places. In addition, the plant has developed resistance to glyphosate, the active ingredient in the widely used broadleaf herbicide Roundup. Glyphosate-resistant pigweed not only dominates in cotton fields, but it has wide ranging effects on other crops and productions, as well.

This plant has a type of pollen which is the cause of a lot of summer and fall hay fever allergies.

However, in Mexico, the seeds are dried, mixed with honey and baked. This produces a very nutritious sweet, food that is very highly prized as a candy in Mexico. We will include photos of such a candy factory in Tlaxcala, near Mexico City.

Amaranth was so necessary to both the religion and nutrition of the Aztecs that it was one of the four grains considered as acceptable tribute from outlying parts of the empire, the other three being corn, beans and chia. The Mendocino Codex indicates that the equivalent of the modern measure of 4,000 tons of amaranth a year arrived in Tenochtitlan.

The leaves and seeds of the amaranth plant are still characteristic ingredients in Mexican cuisine, especially in the states of Morelos, Mexico, Puebla, Tlaxcala, and particularly Oaxaca, where the plant is widely cultivated as a valuable cash crop, worth four times more per kilo than corn. This is understandable, given the fact that amaranth provides a high quality protein, with a nearly perfect balance of essential amino acids, including abundant lysine and methionine, not found in most grains.

We will include photos of an example of such a candy factory in Tlaxcala, Mexico. We will also include the recipe from the owner of the factory, in case you wish to make your own Amaranth Alegría Candy.

We also are placing a nutrition chart at the bottom of the page.

Palmer Amaranth is often confused among the members of the pigweed family, but it is the only one with terminal panicles that are about 18' in length.


Quick Notes:

Height: Up To about 6 1/2 feet tall. Spreads up to about 6 feet wide.

Flowers: The flowers are small and light green in color. They are found in dense, compact terminal panicles that are 6' to 18' in length. The male and female flowers are found on seperate plants.

Flowering Time: June - November.

Fruit: Small, dry, one seeded. It is in a single seeded utricle about 2 mm in size, which splits to show a dark - brown to black seed.

Leaves: Alternate, simple, lance shaped leaf, 2 to 9 inches long, 2 1/2 inches to 2 1/2 inches wide, green above, with white veins beneath. They are found on one central stem in several lateral branches.

Found: Native to Northern Africa, Europe and Asia and is widely naturalised in the USA (AR, AZ, CA, CO, FL, GA, IL, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, MO, MS, NC, NE, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OK, PA, SC, TN, TX, UT, VA, WI, WV), Also found in Canada (ON). Also found throughout Mexico.

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 °C (-15 °F)
USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 °C (-10 °F)
USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 °C (-5 °F)
USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 °C (0 °F)
USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 °C (5 °F)
USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F)
USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)
USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)
USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)
USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)
USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

Soil pH requirements:
5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)
7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)
7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Sun Exposure:
Full Sun

Elevation: 0 - 5,500 Feet.

Habitat: Disturbed soils of hillsides, roadsides, flats, sandy plains. In towns they are largely confined to roadsides, borders of cultivated lands, fields, sidewalks, vacant lots, and drainage areas.

Miscellaneous: Flowering Photos Taken October 13, 2005 In northwest Glendale, Arizona.


Here Is The Recipe for Amaranth Alegría Candy:




  • 3 cups of toasted amaranth seeds
  • 4 tablespoons of honey
  • A few drops of lemon juice


Amaranth Alegría Candy

Preparation:

  1. Heat the honey and lemon juice. This mixture should neither be very thick nor very runny. If it is too liquid, then the alegría candy will fall apart; if it is too thick, them the candy will crack.
  2. Use a wooden spoon to blend the toasted amaranth with the honey mixture, and then flatten it out with a rolling pin until it becomes compact.
  3. Leave the mixture to cool for a while and then cut it into pieces with a wet knife before it sets completely.
  4. You can cut it into squares, rectangles, cylinders, or even roll it into balls. It is best not to make this candy during the rainy season because the humidity in the air makes it fall apart very easily.

    Note: In Mexico, among other places, toasted amaranth seeds may be purchased at the market in Tlaxcala, a village near Mexico City. If you are visiting the ruins at Tlaxcala, you can visit the factory about one block from the ruins.

    The seeds are toasted in the following way: foreign bodies are first removed by passing the seeds through a sieve. It is then necessary to dampen the seeds before toasting them, making sure not to use too much water (one cup of water for three kilograms of seeds is enough). The seeds are then left to dry off in the sun for a few hours; it is a good idea to move them around a little so that they all dry properly. They are then placed on a large, preheated pottery plate called a comal (which is used as a grill), and moved around with a small brush or some straw until they burst and turn white. Finally, the seeds are once again passed through a sieve to separate the burnt seeds.

    Alegría, the name of this candy in Spanish, means Happiness or Joy. We hope you enjoy it.

Amaranth

Scientific Name:     Amaranthus spp.

NDB No:     20001

Nutrient Units Value per
100 grams of
edible portion
Sample
Count
Std.
Error
1 cup
-------
195.0 g
Proximates
Water
g
9.84
11
0.748
19.188
Energy
kcal
374
0
 
729.300
Energy
kj
1565
0
 
3051.750
Protein
g
14.45
12
0.688
28.177
Total lipid (fat)
g
6.51
12
0.327
12.694
Carbohydrate, by difference
g
66.17
0
 
129.031
Fiber, total dietary
g
15.2
0
 
29.640
Ash
g
3.04
11
0.651
5.928
Minerals
Calcium, Ca
mg
153
10
6.859
298.350
Iron, Fe
mg
7.59
9
0.552
14.800
Magnesium, Mg
mg
266
10
9.715
518.700
Phosphorus, P
mg
455
2
 
887.250
Potassium, K
mg
366
10
26.193
713.700
Sodium, Na
mg
21
11
4.696
40.950
Zinc, Zn
mg
3.18
10
0.192
6.201
Copper, Cu
mg
0.777
10
0.067
1.515
Manganese, Mn
mg
2.260
10
0.244
4.407
Vitamins
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
mg
4.2
1
 
8.190
Thiamin
mg
0.080
2
 
0.156
Riboflavin
mg
0.208
3
0.016
0.406
Niacin
mg
1.286
5
0.438
2.508
Pantothenic acid
mg
1.047
2
 
2.042
Vitamin B-6
mg
0.223
2
 
0.435
Folate, total
mcg
49
2
 
95.550
Folic acid
mcg
0
0
 
0.000
Folate, food
mcg
49
2
 
95.550
Folate, DFE
mcg_DFE
49
0
 
95.550
Vitamin B-12
mcg
0.00
0
 
0.000
Vitamin A, IU
IU
0
0
 
0.000
Vitamin A, RE
mcg_RE
0
0
 
0.000
Vitamin E
mg_ATE
1.030
0
 
2.008
Lipids
Fatty acids, total saturated
g
1.662
0
 
3.241
14:0
g
0.011
7
 
0.021
16:0
g
1.284
7
 
2.504
18:0
g
0.220
7
 
0.429
Fatty acids, total monounsaturated
g
1.433
0
 
2.794
18:1 undifferentiated
g
1.433
7
 
2.794
Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated
g
2.891
0
 
5.637
18:2 undifferentiated
g
2.834
7
 
5.526
18:3 undifferentiated
g
0.057
7
 
0.111
Cholesterol
mg
0
0
 
0.000
Phytosterols
mg
24
1
 
46.800
Amino acids
Tryptophan
g
0.181
10
 
0.353
Threonine
g
0.558
38
 
1.088
Isoleucine
g
0.582
38
 
1.135
Leucine
g
0.879
38
 
1.714
Lysine
g
0.747
38
 
1.457
Methionine
g
0.226
32
 
0.441
Cystine
g
0.191
28
 
0.372
Phenylalanine
g
0.542
32
 
1.057
Tyrosine
g
0.329
32
 
0.642
Valine
g
0.679
38
 
1.324
Arginine
g
1.060
30
 
2.067
Histidine
g
0.389
32
 
0.759
Alanine
g
0.799
30
 
1.558
Aspartic acid
g
1.261
30
 
2.459
Glutamic acid
g
2.259
30
 
4.405
Glycine
g
1.636
32
 
3.190
Proline
g
0.698
28
 
1.361
Serine
g
1.148
32
 
2.239

USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 14 (July 2001)

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