Arizona Wild Flowers
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Catclaw Acacia, Fabaceae Acacia greggii.

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Catclaw Acacia, Fabaceae Acacia greggii.  Also called wait-a-minute bush, uña de gato (cat’s claw), tésota, gatuño, palo chino (Chinese stick), tepame, algarroba, tear blanket, devil‘s claw, and Gregg’s catclaw. Arizona Wild Flowers. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions, Information, Reviews.
Catclaw Acacia, Fabaceae Acacia greggii.
Photo Taken June 13, 2003 At Date Creek, Arizona.
Catclaw Acacia, Fabaceae Acacia greggii.  Also called wait-a-minute bush, uña de gato (cat’s claw), tésota, gatuño, palo chino (Chinese stick), tepame, algarroba, tear blanket, devil‘s claw, and Gregg’s catclaw. Arizona Wild Flowers. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions, Information, Reviews.Catclaw Acacia, Fabaceae Acacia greggii.  Also called wait-a-minute bush, uña de gato (cat’s claw), tésota, gatuño, palo chino (Chinese stick), tepame, algarroba, tear blanket, devil‘s claw, and Gregg’s catclaw. Arizona Wild Flowers. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions, Information, Reviews.
Cat’s Claw Acacia.Fabaceae Acacia greggii.
alt="CatclawCatclaw Acacia, Fabaceae Acacia greggii.  Also called wait-a-minute bush, uña de gato (cat’s claw), tésota, gatuño, palo chino (Chinese stick), tepame, algarroba, tear blanket, devil‘s claw, and Gregg’s catclaw. Arizona Wild Flowers. Pictures, Photos, Images, Descriptions, Information, Reviews.
Bees produce Tons Of honey
From Catclaw Blossoms.
It Tastes Great!
Why This Plant Is Called Catclaw
Or Wait A Minute Bush.

Catclaw Acacia.
Fabaceae Acacia greggii, Bean Family ( fabaceae ), Catclaw Acacia. Also called wait-a-minute bush, uña de gato (cat’s claw), tésota, gatuño, palo chino (Chinese stick), tepame, algarroba, tear blanket, devil‘s claw, and Gregg’s catclaw.

We wish to thank Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia for some of the information on this page. We share images and information with Wikipedia.

Acacia greggii is a species of Acacia native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, from the extreme south of Utah (where, at 37°10' N it is the northernmost naturally occurring Acacia species anywhere in the world) south through southern Nevada, southeast California, Arizona, New Mexico and western Texas to Baja California, Sinaloa and Nuevo León in Mexico.

Its common names include Catclaw Acacia, Catclaw Mesquite, Gregg's Catclaw, Devil's Claw, Paradise Flower, Wait-a-minute Tree, and Wait-a-bit Tree. These names are given because the tree has numerous hooked thorns with the shape and size of a cat's claw, that tend to hook onto passers-by; the hooked person must stop and then, "wait a minute," to remove the thorns carefully to avoid injury or shredded clothing.

Catclaw Honey is produced by the honeybee in Arizona. in very large quanities. Catclaw Honey tastes wonderful!

George DeLange, the author of this page is a beekeeper, and George can say that not only does the Catclaw Honey taste great, but the thorns of the Catclaw Tree, sure do hurt and make you "Wait A Minute."

Catclaw is a thicket forming shrub or small tree that can reach heights of about 30 feet. Cat‘s claw is a perennial with an average life span greater than 100 years.

The O’odham Native Americans in Arizona, drink a tea from the roots for both stomach and kidney problems. The Seri and Yaqui People use the wood in their bows.


Quick Notes:

Height: About 6 - 15 feet. Can reach 30 feet.

Flowers: Pale yellow, sometimes cream colored; in a tight elongated, showy clusters, 2 to 3 inches long, fragrant, appearing in spring and early summer. Inflorescences, axillary spikes.

Flowering Time: April to June.

Seed Pod: A 3 to 6 inch long, ½ inch wide, flattened, very twisted legume, brown, maturing in mid to late summer.

Stems/Trunks: An attractive gray shaggy - rough trunk; the stems have small curved thorns.

Leaves: The leaves are alternate, bipinnately compound, 1 to 2 inches long, with 1 to 3 pairs of major leaflets, 4 to 6 pairs of minor leaflets (1/4 inch long), dull green in color.

Found: Southwestern United States and northern Mexico.

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 °C (0 °F)
USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 °C (5 °F)
USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F)
USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)
USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)
USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)
USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)
USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)
USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Soil pH requirements:
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)
7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)
7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Sun Exposure:
Full Sun

Elevation: 0 - 6,000 feet.

Habitat: Washes, flats and canyons below 6000', creosote bush scrub, pinyon-juniper woodland, deserts.

Miscellaneous: Flowering Photos Taken At Date Creek, Arizona. June 13, 2003.

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